BOOK REVIEW: Neil Gaiman “The Graveyard Book” Graphic Novels Volume I & II

Title: The Graveyard Book Graphic Novels Volume I & II

Author: Neil Gaiman

Adaptator: P Craig Russell

Illustrator(s): Kevin Nowlan, P Craig Russell, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson, Stephen B Scott, David Lafuente

Genre: Fantasy/Horror

My Rating: 5/5 stars

 

The only exposure I’ve had to Neil Gaiman before this was Trigger Warning and Norse Mythology, both excellent representations but both collections of short stories. I’ve had about the same amount of experience with graphic novels; nonetheless, I was excited about this read.

Full disclosure, I have not actually read The Graveyard Book, but I fully intend to now. I never knew what it was about and just happened to see both volumes of the graphic novel edition at my library, so I didn’t think it would hurt to pick it up. Selfishly, I also know that graphic novels tend to be quick reads and I was thinking about my 100 book reading goal for 2018, but we won’t get into that.

The Graveyard Book is a story about a little boy, affectionately named Nobody Owens, who was raised by ghosts in a graveyard. The rest of his family had been murdered, so the inhabitants of the nearby cemetery take it upon themselves to protect the infant boy and keep him safe.

The only not-dead resident of the graveyard is Silas, who is presumably a vampire but I’m not sure if we’re ever expressly told this. I think it was more implied, and based on his illustrated form, I think it’s safe to come to this conclusion. Since Silas is the only one who can come and go from the graveyard as he pleases, he becomes Nobody’s (nicknamed Bod) guardian, bringing back food, clothing, and other things needed to take care of a growing boy.

This story follows Bod as he grows up in the graveyard and the people that take care of him. We watch him develop and learn new things, watch him make friends, mostly with ghosts, sometimes with humans. We can see how his upbringing has affected him and has made him a more naïve, yet more interesting, person. Bod is curious and brave, but he also likes to get into trouble. We get to follow him on those adventures, too.

Neil Gaiman is oh so creative and this story is unique, special, breathtaking at times, heartbreaking at times, and all-around mesmerizing and beautiful. I truly loved basically every moment of this story. I loved Bod’s interactions with the other ghosts, particularly his relationship with Silas. I loved seeing this entirely new world of the dead and seeing how Bod and others react to it. I loved the mystery surrounding Bod’s family’s deaths. Throughout the story, we get the impression that their murderer is still searching for Bod, and we’re left to wonder why.

As for the illustrations, each chapter or section of the book was done by a different artist. The color scheme remained the same, and basic character’s traits, but the drawings each had a unique look to them which made the reading experience all the more interesting.

This was an absolutely beautiful adaptation of what I assume is a work of art. I’m so excited to read The Graveyard Book but until then, I highly recommend this version.

 

Neil Gaiman: Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

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